Posts filed under ‘E-Resources’

Know Your eResources Quiz: Day 4

As part of HCI’s 2011 Library Week and World Book Day celebrations, we are once again conducting our annual Know Your eResources Quiz! Find the answers to each day’s questions by researching the school’s Online Resources, and then email your answers to hcikclibrary@gmail.com.

Day 4 (The Sciences)

1. How do good bacteria affect bad greenhouse gases?

2. What did the president of the World Wildlife Federation say about the United States on climate change? Name two specific things that the United States done about climate change.

3. What is wrong with the popular explanation regarding “How aeroplane wings work”? How do they really work?

4. With regards to the radiation disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, (a) what is a “meltdown”? (b) How is this different from the radiation disaster at Chernobyl?

(Hint: look in Scientific American, Online Ecologist, Physics Education and Education in Chemistry.)

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April 21, 2011 at 7:30 am

Know Your eResources Quiz: Day 3

As part of HCI’s 2011 Library Week and World Book Day celebrations, we are once again conducting our annual Know Your eResources Quiz! Find the answers to each day’s questions by researching the school’s Online Resources, and then email your answers to hcikclibrary@gmail.com.

Day 3 (All About China)

1. Jack Gray learnt various things from his reading of Mao Zedong and study of Chinese rural economy. What were they?

2. What did Dr Sun Yat Sen contribute to China? Name two ways in which he is commemorated today.

(Hint: look in China Quarterly and Newslink.)

April 20, 2011 at 7:30 am

Know Your eResources Quiz: Day 2

As part of HCI’s 2011 Library Week and World Book Day celebrations, we are once again conducting our annual Know Your eResources Quiz! Find the answers to each day’s questions by researching the school’s Online Resources, and then email your answers to hcikclibrary@gmail.com.

Day 2 (History and Perspective)

1. During the United States Civil War, what was the guiding statement of Ulysses S. Grant’s review  about the military and presidential career of a hero?

2. Provide two examples of how laws are passed concerning abortion and reproductive rights.

(Hint: look in World and I and Opposing Viewpoints.)

April 19, 2011 at 7:30 am

Know Your eResources Quiz: Day 1

As part of HCI’s 2011 Library Week and World Book Day celebrations, we are once again conducting our annual Know Your eResources Quiz! Find the answers to each day’s questions by researching the school’s Online Resources, and then email your answers to hcikclibrary@gmail.com.

The top three students with the most correct answers will receive prizes to be awarded during flag-raising next week.

Here we go!

Day 1 (General Introduction)

1. How many login IDs are available for The Straits Times Interactive for the High School Section?

2. (a) How many eResources are accessible from home? (b) Name two that are concerned with Current Affairs.

(Hint: look to the site where login and password information can be found for the eResources.)

April 18, 2011 at 7:46 am

E-Resource Feature Focus: Chemistry

Each month, the Kong Chian Library Club will feature the online e-resources available to teachers and students at Hwa Chong Institution, grouped by academic subject. The aim of such a feature focus is to shine attention on the variety of resources available in order to increase exposure and usage. This month’s review will pertain specifically to Chemistry e-resources.

Journal of Chemical Education is published by the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society and it targets Chemistry educators. It includes practice questions along with explained solutions, demonstrations and interactive 3D models. This website encourages dynamic teaching and may be useful for teachers who want to arouse interest in the topic covered or increase the students’ depth of understanding of content taught in preparation for a test. Contributions are by a wide range of professors from colleges and universities, thus reliability is mostly assured. Another advantage of this e-resource is that it contains a wide range of content in the form of software, papers, articles and journals which cater to those studying in secondary school, even up to university level.

While the general public won’t get to see the demonstrations or published journals, non-subscribers have access to select site content, such as chemistry questions and explained solutions. This e-resource is also rather unique and extremely useful in how it recommends books to educators via Hal’s Picks of the Month. These resources may show teachers how to teach the subject or they may contain additional content which educators may wish to use to supplement lessons.

One downside for this e-resource is that the content is not adequately organized. While there may be numerous pages within the website, they are only classified according to general subject areas and the materials are not specifically categorized for different learning ages or groups. Thus, educators have to be judicious when assessing the website and sieve out content appropriate for the Chemistry standard of the students.

Scientific American covers a wide range of scientific topics (including Chemistry) and it mainly features scientific reports and articles from around the world. One of the major advantages of this e-resource is its excellent organization of content. The latest scientific articles & the most popular ones are featured while other subsections present include “Observations” (articles which use scientific trends to create hypotheses or predictions), “Expeditions” (reports on scientific data collated from trips) and “News.”

Another advantage of this e-resource is that it encompasses multiple features that enhance its appeal. The forum allows for discussion on chemistry findings while podcasts give audio chemistry-related lectures or talks. There are also pictorial slideshows and even videos to complement the website, and an archive is kept to the facilitate retrieval of old articles. This website can be utilized as an excellent project resource.

Thanks to See Wern Hao (3P2) and Gong Wei Jin (2P3) for their write-ups of the two e-resources featured above.

August 31, 2010 at 4:30 pm 2 comments

E-Resource Feature Focus: Humanities

Each month, the Kong Chian Library Club will feature the online e-resources available to teachers and students at Hwa Chong Institution, grouped by academic subject. The aim of such a feature focus is to shine attention on the variety of resources available in order to increase exposure and usage. This month features an additional review (the first concerned Biology), and will pertain specifically to Humanities e-resources.

World and I (login required) features four areas of primary interest: Social Studies, Language Arts, Science and the Arts. The site contains articles of a wide variety, ranging from Economics and Education in the Social Studies category to Worldwide Folktales and Poetry in Language Arts. The articles are numerous and rich in information, and reward patient and critical reading; those texts that may be dense in meaning challenge the reader in one’s interpretation, and encourage one to slow down and concentrate to gain understanding. For those hoping to navigate the plentiful number of articles in each topic, the site has kindly organized the articles into different subtopics for relevance.

Opposing Viewpoints deals mainly with current affairs, although several articles do touch on historical topics. The topics covered are diverse and plentiful, including those such as Abortion, Education, Islamic Fundamentalism, and Women’s Rights. The resources, as the name “Opposing Viewpoints” suggests, come in the form of articles and commentaries on societal problems or issues, and most are paired, such as “Religion is Essential to a Moral Society” and “Religion is Not Essential to a Moral Society.” The articles themselves are interesting and comprehensive, and, like other scholarly articles, include references which could be used for further reading on the subject. With comprehensive categorisation into subtopics, degrees of difficulty, article length and others, the website is easy to browse and to search in order to refine one’s scope. Many other options are also available, such as downloading an article as a PDF, which adds that extra convenience for the user that many other services lack. Undoubtedly, Opposing Viewpoints is an intuitive resource that will meet the needs of both academics and casual information-seekers alike.

Mdm Chan May Lun, one of several excellent humanities teachers at HCI, has found World and I very helpful for her teaching, and has the following to say:

World & I Online Magazine is a great site for History and Social Studies teachers. It is well-designed, easy to use and offers great content. It is graphically attractive and the particular appeal of this site is the good balance of Arts, Science and Culture information, which offers a great platform for Interdisciplinary Lessons.

The articles are comprehensive and very useful to develop critical thinking through the use of “Paul’s Wheel Activity” (please see example below) and preparation for class debates.

For example, one of the articles I used was: “Why our Vietnam Strategy Failed,” by Bruce Palmer Jr. Seven dimensions assessed from the article:

  1. Identify and summarize the problem at issue (Vietnam war)
  2. Identify and present your group’s OWN hypothesis, perspective and position as it is important to the analysis of the article
  3. Identify and considers OTHER salient perspectives and positions that are important to the analysis (the American & Vietnamese perspectives)
  4. Identify and assess the key assumptions
  5. Identify and assess the quality of supporting data/evidence and provide additional data/evidence related to the issue
  6. Identify and consider the influence of the context on the issue
  7. Identify and assess conclusions, implications and consequences

In conclusion, this is a highly usable and content-rich resource that has no difficulties in staying abreast with latest works/analyses. In my opinion, it is indispensable for students and teachers who are seeking documents for their research.

Thanks to Jeremy Yeo (3P1) and Matthew Lee (3I1) for their write-ups of the two e-resources featured above. And especial thanks go to Mdm Chan May Lun for her testimonial about World and I.

July 20, 2010 at 11:38 am Leave a comment

E-Resource Feature Focus: Biology

Each month, the Kong Chian Library Club will feature the online e-resources available to teachers and students at Hwa Chong Institution, grouped by academic subject. The aim of such a feature focus is to shine attention on the variety of resources available in order to increase exposure and usage. This month’s review will pertain specifically to Biology e-resources.

Journal of Biological Education takes the form of a monthly periodical, with many different issues covered. However, as it mainly focuses on biological education rather than the wide spectrum of biology, it is possibly more relevant and useful for teachers interested in research and pedagogical approaches than for students. The site contains interviews with experts, and is thus ideal if a viewer wishes to do advanced research.

Encyclopedia of Life Sciences is the online edition of the eponymous 26-volume print edition published by Wiley-Blackwell. The articles are written by leaders in the field, cover subjects from ecology to neuroscience, and are available to download and print in PDF format. The site hosts many high-quality colour illustrations to accompany the articles, which improves understanding and also gives the reader a clearer understanding of the articles. Appendices and glossary material also provide additional essential information on a given subject.

Although the articles are lengthy (the equivalent of three to ten or more printed pages), they are well-written and richly cross-referenced. Each article begins with a brief abstract and is broken up by helpful subheadings. The search function is also extremely helpful in that allows readers to type keywords into it to find the related subject; the keyword searching method is effective and quick, giving fairly relevant results. With over 4,300 specially commissioned, peer-reviewed articles from leading scientists around the world, this site is a treasure trove of biological information.

Thanks to Yau Chun Shin (3H1), Yeo Jun Hui (3A3), and Leon Tay (2P3) for their write-ups of the two e-resources featured above.

July 12, 2010 at 8:00 am 1 comment

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Library Club Leadership

Teachers In-Charge:
Mrs Rosalind Lee (SC)
Mdm Chan May Lun
Mdm Shieh Le-shiang
Mrs Kris Koo (Senior AO)
Mrs Wang Meng Juan (AO)

2011-12 ExCo:
Foo Yang Yi (Chairman)
Kervin Tay (Vice-Chairman)
Ian Wong (Training & Recruitment)
Zach Wang (Public Relations)
Joel Lee (Welfare)

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